Halted by the complexity of time
to wonder now where this moment
came from and why; and how long it

What matters is how you conquer Eternity

will last before the next.

Concepts seem to eternal their way
through the mind, a continuous flow
of meandering confusion.

Fears
fluid uneasiness, warm
frightened blood
passing vein to vein.

Where there can’t be time
there is no question
but life and even death
evolve that cycle

of numbed units….

that you eventually Die on a
Wednesday at noon makes no
difference.

From then on what matters is
how you conquer Eternity.

~ *•.¸♥♥¸.•*
© Susan Joyner-Stumpf

(One of my earliest poems, written at age 9. With this Poem, I won my first Writing Contest. The rest is history. I think even the Teachers were shocked.)

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Comments
  1. drtruthman says:

    Beautiful and deep poem. This is so hard to fathom a 9 year old girl could write this but then again, knowing the talent of Susan, it all seems so perfectly natural. God was preparing Susan’s writing ability even at that tender age. Just beautiful Susan.

  2. debbiebrooks37 says:

    wow Susan. this is hard to write about. but you need a great job and so moving and deep…and very brave. A lot of people cant write about this subject.
    God Bless you Susan.
    Excellent poem
    Debbie

  3. You can see the immaturity and simplicity of the lines as far as structurally and conceptually but I guess considering I was only nine when I wrote this, then it’s easy to forgive. One might wonder of my advanced command of the English Language @ such a young and early age. Well, alongside writing my own poems and stories, I adored reading anything I could get my hands on and it was nothing for me to read three rather large Novels a week, like Herman Melville’s Moby Dick, J. D. Salinger’s Catcher in the Rye, John Kennedy Toole’s A Confederacy of Dunces, or John Steinbeck’s The Grapes of Wrath or Of Mice and Men. What left an indelible impression on me to this day was Oscar Wildes’ The Picture of Dorian Gray. All those books I wrote extensive and thoroughly researched Book Reports which had the Teachers reeling in their pencil ad pen boxes. I also loved and definitely included in my reports were my smaller Poetry books like e.e. cummings, T.S Eliot, Edgar Allen Poe, Emily Dickinson, Jack Marshall and Mary Oliver, Masters in the Poetic Realm just as much as Stephen King in the Horror realm and Danielle Steele in her mastery. My teachers understandably loved my Book Reports. But being an advent reader helped expand my vocabulary and burst them to the seams, helping me early on as a young writer write far beyond my naieve years.

  4. You can see the immaturity and simplicity of the lines as far as structurally and conceptually but I guess considering I was only nine when I wrote this, then it’s easy to forgive. One might wonder of my advanced command of the English Language @ such a young and early age. Well, alongside writing my own poems and stories, I adored reading anything I could get my hands on and it was nothing for me to read three rather large Novels a week, like Herman Melville’s Moby Dick, J. D. Salinger’s Catcher in the Rye, John Kennedy Toole’s A Confederacy of Dunces, or John Steinbeck’s The Grapes of Wrath or Of Mice and Men. What left an indelible impression on me to this day was Oscar Wildes’ The Picture of Dorian Gray. All those books I wrote extensive and thoroughly researched Book Reports which had the Teachers reeling in their pencil ad pen boxes. I also loved and definitely included in my reports were my smaller Poetry books like e.e. cummings, T.S Eliot, Edgar Allen Poe, Emily Dickinson, Jack Marshall and Mary Oliver, Masters in the Poetic Realm just as much as Stephen King in the Horror realm and Danielle Steele in her mastery. My teachers understandably loved my Book Reports. But being an advent reader helped expand my vocabulary and burst them to the seams, helping me early on as a young writer write far beyond my naieve years.

  5. drtruthman says:

    OK, Susan, I have updated the settings and you should not have the problem any further.
    Make sure when you are logged into your own WordPress site that you CLICK the Title, otherwise, the Comment section of the Blog will not show up. This is only for the author of the blog not other people who are logged into WordPress on their own blogs.
    Hope this helps. Lee

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